A Breakdown of the Differences Between Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease

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The terms “Alzheimer’s” and “dementia” are often used interchangeably, but they are actually two different conditions. Alzheimer’s disease is a specific form of dementia that is characterized by the death of brain cells. Dementia, on the other hand, is a general term that refers to a decline in mental ability. It can be caused by a variety of illnesses or injuries, including alzheimers.

Read on for a look at dementia vs alzheimer’s:

There are many different types of dementia, but the most common ones are Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, and Lewy body dementia. Each type of dementia has its own unique characteristics and symptoms.

Alzheimer’s Disease

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Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of dementia, accounting for 60-80% of all cases. It is a neurodegenerative disease that causes progressive memory loss and cognitive decline. The first symptoms are usually problems with recalling recent events or conversations, and eventually patients may lose the ability to remember their own name or identity. Other symptoms include changes in mood and behavior, difficulty with tasks such as bathing and dressing, and problems with speech and swallowing. There is currently no cure for Alzheimer’s disease, but there are treatments available that can help slow down the progression of the disease.

Vascular Dementia

Vascular dementia is the second most common type of dementia, accounting for around 20% of all cases. It is caused by problems with the blood vessels in the brain, which can lead to a shortage of oxygen and nutrients. This can damage the brain cells and cause the symptoms of dementia. Symptoms can vary depending on which part of the brain is affected, but common symptoms include memory loss, confusion, problems with speech and coordination, and changes in mood and behavior. There is no cure for vascular dementia, but treatments are available to help manage the symptoms.

Lewy Body Dementia

Lewy body dementia is the third most common type of dementia, accounting for around 10% of all cases. It is a progressive disease that causes the death of brain cells. Symptoms can vary depending on which part of the brain is affected, but common symptoms include problems with thinking and reasoning, changes in mood and behavior, visual hallucinations, and parkinsonian symptoms such as tremor and problems with movement. There is no cure for this form of dementia, but there are treatments available that can help manage the symptoms.

Alzheimer’s vs. Dementia

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Alzheimer’s is a progressive disease that worsens over time. Early symptoms include problems with memory and thinking skills. As the disease progresses, people with alzheimers may have trouble speaking, swallowing, and caring for themselves. Ultimately, the disease leads to death.

Dementia is also a progressive disease, but it can affect people in different ways. Some people with dementia experience problems with memory and thinking skills, while others may have problems with movement and coordination. Dementia can also cause changes in mood and behavior, and lead to a decline in physical abilities.

Treatment Options

There is no known cure for Alzheimer’s, but there are treatments available that can help to slow the progression of the disease. These treatments include medications, lifestyle changes, and support services.

Dementia, on the other hand, is a group of symptoms that are caused by various diseases or conditions that affect the brain. There is no cure for dementia, but there are treatments available that can help to improve quality of life. These treatments may include medications, lifestyle changes, and support services.

With both Alzheimer’s and dementia, the goal of treatment is to maintain the person’s independence and quality of life for as long as possible. This may involve providing support and assistance with activities of daily living, as well as using adaptive devices or strategies to help the person stay as independent as possible.

By Michael Caine

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